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Weight Loss Clinic with Semaglutide in Saint Louis Park, MN

We offer advanced health and wellness treatments and new advanced therapies

Weight Loss Clinic With Semaglutide Saint Louis Park, MN

An Advanced Weight Loss Solution from LX Medical

LX Medical's weight loss program has helped numerous patients achieve their weight loss goals, live a healthy life, and enjoy total well-being for years. At LX Medical, we believe that weight loss shouldn't be centered around a one-size-fits-all mentality. Our doctors and practitioners create custom weight loss programs that are tailored to your unique body, rather than creating plans based off of someone matching your age or weight. With our team's support, you can achieve real results and start living life without the extra pounds.

That's important in the modern world, where maintaining good health and fitness has become more important than ever. Research has shown that viruses and diseases are more likely to affect people who are overweight and unhealthy. Unfortunately, there are many "miracle" supplements and unhealthy diet plans that mislead people into thinking that weight loss is not beneficial. Furthermore, weight loss "experts" often offer unstructured and unsupervised programs that do more harm than good.

At LX Medical, we prioritize the well-being of our patients when it comes to weight loss. Our approach is patient-centric, focusing on personalized treatments. Our doctors first evaluate your lifestyle habits, and we work with you to replace negative patterns with positive, personalized lifestyle changes. This is crucial for achieving optimal wellness and weight loss. Benefits of losing weight include:

  • Lower Triglycerides
  • Lower Blood Pressure
  • Lower Risk of Heart Attack
  • Lower Risk of Stroke
  • Better Mobility
  • Less Joint Pai
  • More Energy
  • Better Mood
  • Increased Libido
  • Much More

However, losing weight is only the beginning. To keep weight off permanently, adopting a healthy, active lifestyle is essential. At LX Medical, we help you achieve this by implementing manageable, positive lifestyle changes that jumpstart your weight loss journey. By making healthy behaviors a part of your daily routine, you can achieve your weight loss goals and become the best version of yourself.

One of the most successful treatments we offer to help patients shed pounds safely is peptide therapy for weight loss in Saint Louis Park, MN. In fact, peptides for weight loss, such as semaglutide (also known as Ozempic and Wegovy, MOTS-C,) and AOD-9604, have been proven to be effective and have helped countless men and women live life at a healthy weight.

Weight Loss Clinic With Semaglutide Saint Louis Park, MN
Weight Loss Clinic With Semaglutide Saint Louis Park, MN

Peptides Explained

Consisting of amino acids, peptides help regulate the biological processes and functions in your body. As the building blocks of protein, they are crucial for your overall health. Unfortunately, however, many men and women suffer from peptide deficiency. Peptide therapy gives your body the peptides it needs, improving your ability to:

  • Burn Fat
  • Keep Weight Off
  • Heal Wounds
  • Build Muscle Mass
  • Reverse Fatigue
  • Much More

Peptide therapy is often used alongside other treatment plans from LX Medical, such as our custom weight loss plans. That's where peptides like semaglutide and AOD-9604 come into play.

What is Peptide Therapy for Weight Loss in Saint Louis Park, MN?

Peptide therapy is often used to boost hormones and support our total well-being. Different types of peptides can target different areas of our health. For example, some collagen peptide supplements can help make our skin, hair, and gut healthier. Other peptides, like semaglutide and AOD-9604, can help facilitate healthy weight loss.

Peptide therapy works in a different way than vitamin supplements. When we take a multivitamin for our hair, skin, and nails, our body must absorb the nutrients. But sometimes, our body can't absorb all the nutrients, so they just leave our body through our urine. Peptides, on the other hand, are part of the proteins in our bodies, making them easier to benefit from and absorb.

But what about peptide therapy for weight loss? The truth is there are various peptides that have different effects, including some that facilitate weight loss. However, weight loss is a nuanced process that involves multiple factors such as diet, exercise, age, genetics, and lifestyle. While peptides can assist you in achieving your weight loss goals, they are most effective when combined with improvements like a healthier diet, more frequent exercise, and better life choices. If you've tried various weight loss plans and diets, but haven't had any success, peptides like semaglutide and ADO-9604 may be the extra boost you need to experience true weight loss.

The Best Peptides for Weight Loss in Saint Louis Park, MN

A recent study in the Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism found that people who used peptides in conjunction with a weight loss plan experienced incredible results. More specifically, patients reported a 14% reduction in body fat on average. Two of the most popular peptides for weight loss also happen to be FDA-approved and, when appropriate, part of your weight loss journey with LX Medical.

Those peptides are semaglutide and AOD-9604 and are touted for their therapeutic benefits and long-term safety profile. If you're looking for a little extra help to lose weight and keep it off for good, peptide therapy for weight loss could be for you.

Weight Loss Clinic With Semaglutide Saint Louis Park, MN

Semaglutide for Weight Loss

Looking to shed some pounds and keep them off for good? Diet and exercise are crucial, but for busy adults and parents, sticking to a routine is easier said than done. If you need extra help losing weight, consider semaglutide. This injection, approved by the FDA for diabetes and obesity, can stimulate GLP-1 receptors in the brain to aid in quicker weight loss and long-term health.

Semaglutide works in several ways. First, it acts as glucagon in your body, which helps tell your brain that you're full and don't need to eat anymore. Secondly, it slows down the time it takes for food to transit out of your stomach. This process reduces unnecessary eating and snacking throughout the day. Perhaps more importantly, it reduces glucose spikes after you eat, which causes a litany of issues like inflammation.

Semaglutide also helps your pancreas secrete insulin while making you insulin sensitive. This regulates glucose levels in your body and how your body metabolizes that glucose. Additionally, by reducing inflammation in your body, you benefit from powerful anti-aging and longevity properties.

When combined with a healthy diet and regular exercise, semaglutide can provide:

  • Long-Lasting Weight Loss
  • Reduced Risk of Heart Disease
  • Regulated Glucose Levels
  • Insulin Control
  • Body Fat Reduction
  • More Energy
  • Better Recovery
  • Less Inflammation

Semaglutide Cycle Info

Unlike other weight loss clinics, at LX Medical, you can enjoy the benefits of semaglutide from the comfort of your office or home. Injections are administered once a week. Once you've met your weight loss goals, you can reduce your intake to a minimum dose for additional positive effects like ongoing weight management. You can also quit taking semaglutide entirely. If you opt to stop, our medical weight loss team can chat with you about other types of peptide therapy for weight loss in Saint Louis Park, MN.

AOD-9604 for Weight Loss

This peptide, which is often used in conjunction with semaglutide regimens, stimulates the breakdown of fat while inhibiting lipogenesis and supporting your tendons and cartilage. It has grown in popularity because of its ability to boost your metabolism, which helps burn fat. What's great about AOD-9604 is that it stimulates the pituitary gland but does not affect tissue growth or blood sugar. Perhaps most impressive is that this peptide can burn fat without you feeling the need to overeat as a result.

In fact, AOD-9604 activates your body's fat-burning processes using its own unique mechanism without needing an HGH receptor. It also releases obese fat cells and reduces new fat cell accumulation. One of the most notable benefits of AOD-9604 is its ability to regulate blood sugar and manage insulin levels, which can lead to reduced inflammation and weight loss. Additionally, AOD-9604 can aid in building muscle, similar to growth hormones. Its benefits extend beyond fat loss, as it contains regenerative properties that may be beneficial for individuals with various conditions, such as:

  • Diabetes
  • Depression
  • Damage to Bones
  • Damaged or Worn-Out Cartilage
  • Arthritis
  • More

With the ability to reduce fat that is stored in your abdominal region, this weight-loss peptide is very popular for older people with stubborn belly fat. It is also often used by people who have tried other diets and weight loss plans but had little or no success.

Gut Health Peptides for Weight Loss and Well-Being

At LX Medical, our doctors offer a range of peptide therapies for your health and well-being. Peptides like semaglutide and AOD-9604 are often used as part of a comprehensive peptide therapy plan, crafted by LX Medical specialists for your body. If you're interested in losing weight, gut health peptides like BPC-157, Thymulosin Alpha, Thymulosin Beta, and GHK-Cu can be incredibly beneficial along your weight loss journey.

BPC-157

This naturally occurring peptide, sometimes called the "Body Protection Compound," is secreted in your gut and helps repair its lining. It works by helping your body be in a constant state of restoration and repair, providing powerful anti-inflammatory effects. This process helps with issues like:

  • Joint Pain
  • Wound Healing
  • Tissue Damage
  • Inflammation
  • Free Radical Protection
  • More

When it comes to losing weight, BPC-157 is often included in peptide therapy for weight loss in Saint Louis Park, MN, because it can help reduce pain and inflammation resulting from new or increased exercise efforts. As noted previously, exercise and diet are key in long-term weight loss, and BPC-157 can make those efforts easier.

Weight Loss Clinic With Semaglutide Saint Louis Park, MN

BPC-157 Cycle Info

This peptide is injected once a day, with courses ranging from 30 to 60 days. After you finish the injection course, consider BPC-157 oral supplements to maintain its benefits.

Weight Loss Clinic With Semaglutide Saint Louis Park, MN

Thymulosin Alpha

Thymosin Alpha-1 is a powerful immune system modulator that helps you resist infections, illnesses, and disease. By naturally stimulating T cells to locate and eliminate viruses, bacteria, and even tumor cells, this peptide prompts your body to respond to these invasive organisms, making your immune system naturally stronger and more effective.

Numerous clinical studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of Thymosin Alpha-1 in regulating immunity and inflammation related to rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and other conditions. Recent clinical studies have also shown promising results in using this peptide to fight lung, colon, breast, and other types of cancer. By reducing inflammation in your body and enhancing your immune system, you can optimize your body as you lose weight with the help of LX Medical.

Thymulosin Alpha Cycle Information

Patients inject this peptide every day for two weeks and then continue three times a week for 2.5 months.

Thymulosin Beta

Thymosin Beta-4 is a peptide consisting of 43 amino acids that is known to promote healing in the body and has anti-inflammatory properties. It occurs naturally in higher concentrations at injury sites and is a water-soluble protein that can regulate cell migration to a site. It is also very good at repairing tissue damage. The substance is not only beneficial for wound healing and skin repair but can also aid in the repair of the brain, spinal cord, and heart. Medical professionals consider Thymosin Beta-4 to be a safe and potent substance in both its natural and synthetic forms.

Like its Alpha counterpart, this peptide can be beneficial for individuals undergoing weight loss, and can help reduce the inflammation and pain associated with exercising and more.

Thymulosin Beta Cycle Information

Patients inject this peptide every day for two weeks and then continue three times a week for 2.5 months.

Weight Loss Clinic With Semaglutide Saint Louis Park, MN

GHK-Cu

Research suggests that GHK-CU functions as a feedback signal when tissue damage occurs. This peptide is effective in shielding damaged tissue, reducing inflammation, and replacing scarred tissue with healthy tissue. Although further research is necessary to determine its effectiveness on a larger scale, GHK-CU has already been proven to play a role in wound healing and inflammation reduction. Like other peptides for weight loss in Saint Louis Park, MN, GHK-Cu supports your gut health and weight loss efforts by lowering inflammation in your body, which often happens from changes to your diet or exercise regimens.

GHK-Cu Cycle Info

Patients should take this peptide for 20-30 days, especially when used for wound healing or as part of a more robust peptide therapy package.

Experience the LX Medical Weight Loss Difference

At LX Medical, we're proud to make better care possible.

We are a physician-led team of doctors, nurses, and health experts, advised by a panel of top healthcare leaders who are revolutionizing the power of house calls. In fact, all of our peptides for weight loss in Saint Louis Park, MN, can be applied in your home or office without having to wait in long lines or uncomfortable waiting rooms.

We offer exceptionally robust and personalized weight loss plans for patients who can't seem to lose extra weight. To do so, we use innovative weight loss medications such as semaglutide and AOD-9604. To supplement our patient's success, we bring with us advanced diagnostic technology, IV fluids, and medications, with access to outpatient imaging and lab centers. Unlike some weight loss centers, we only staff highly-trained medical professionals and advanced practice providers with experience and compassion.

Are you sick and tired of the way that you look and feel every day? Is your health getting out of control? Are you ready to break out of your cage and lose weight the right way? If you're ready to begin your journey to weight loss success, our team is here to guide you along the way. Contact LX Medical today to get started.

Call Us Now

phone-number612-662-5448

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Latest News in Saint Louis Park, MN

St. Louis Park Water Supply Remains Reliable Despite Challenges

From the Summer 2014WaterlineA complete list of feature stories can be found on the Waterline webpage. A May 1964 fire in the yards of Republic Creosoting produced more smoke than flames, but it lured many curious residents to the site. It was reported that the black smoke could be seen as far away as St. Paul, more th...

From the Summer 2014Waterline

A complete list of feature stories can be found on the Waterline webpage.

A May 1964 fire in the yards of Republic Creosoting produced more smoke than flames, but it lured many curious residents to the site. It was reported that the black smoke could be seen as far away as St. Paul, more than 10 miles to the east.

Incorporated as a village in 1886 and taking the status of a city 68 years later, St. Louis Park is a suburb to the west of Minneapolis. It has been home to sports announcer and writer Halsey Hall, filmmakers Joel and Ethan Coen, senator and comedian Al Franken, football coach Marc Trestman, and New York Times columnist and author Thomas Friedman.

Well drillers and plumbers who also made St. Louis Park their home and center of business operations played a major role in the development of a public water system that now serves 49,000 residents. McAlpine Well Company was formed in 1922 and located at 1333 Kentucky Avenue, near Wayzata Boulevard (now Interstate 394). Plumber Gust Hoglund began operations from his home in St. Louis Park in 1924, and within 10 years the village passed its first plumbing ordinance and had its first connection, by the Church of Holy Name, to the municipal water main. The Motzko family, now in its third generation of operation in St. Louis Park, was responsible for many of the early connections to the water supply.

E. H. Renner & Sons, currently located in Elk River, Minnesota, was started in St. Louis Park. The well-drilling company’s current president and chief executive officer, Roger Renner, was born into the firm in 1949, along with his twin brother, Ray, who is now the firm’s vice president. The family home and company headquarters then co-existed at 5800 Goodrich Avenue as the company was heading into its third generation of family leadership at the time and was already prominent in providing water to the rapidly growing area.

Today, St. Louis Park supplies water to residents from nine active wells, ranging in depth from 286 to 1,095 feet and drawing from the Prairie du Chien-Jordan, Mt. Simon-Hinckley, Jordan-St. Lawrence, Platteville, and St. Peter aquifers. The city used sand filters to reduce iron and manganese levels, but over time it became apparent that more effort was needed to keep the water safe.

Beginning in 1917, the plant and yard of Republic Creosoting Company, a division of Reilly Tar and Chemical Corporation, covered 80 acres to the southwest of 32nd Street and Louisiana Avenue. Republic Creosoting distilled coal tar and made a variety of products, including creosote that was used to treat rail ties and other lumber at the site. The area was sparsely populated initially, but as the community grew following World War II, the appearance and odors of the site became a cause of increasing concern to residents as well as city and state officials.

The Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) issued a report on the site as far back as 1938, noting pollution at the site from the creosote operations. By this time, problems were evident as St. Louis Park had already closed its first municipal well because of odor problems and a coal-tar taste.

In 1970 the newly created Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) sued Reilly Tar and Chemical; two years later, St. Louis Park purchased the land and took over responsibility for the cleanup. The site was deeded to the city’s housing and redevelopment authority and portions of the site later sold to private parties, who constructed a tavern, condominiums, and townhouses.

As the property became one of the first Superfund sites in the country in the early 1980s, the MPCA amended its original lawsuit against Reilly Tar and Chemical; in addition, city, state, and federal agencies pursued legal and administrative actions.

Reilly hired a consulting firm in Pittsburgh to help it deal with the lawsuits, and a young geologist named Bill Gregg got his first exposure to the issue. More than 30 years later, Gregg is still working on it. “This is my career project,” he said. The parties to the lawsuit reached a consent decree/remedial action plan in 1986, prompting Gregg to move to the Twin Cities, and he has continued to work with the company and St. Louis Park even while changing employers. For the past three years, Gregg has worked for Summit Envirosolutions, Inc. of St. Paul.

For decades the woodtreating process left lumber dripping with creosote that percolated into the water table. On-site waste disposal was through ditches that flowed to an adjacent wetland. Beyond that was the discovery on the site of an abandoned production well from 1917 that Gregg characterizes as “a poster child for the well code.” A down-hole camera in the well detected openings in the casing that allowed for contaminants to enter the Prairie du Chien aquifer. “If not for this well,” Gregg said, “a lot of the problems wouldn’t exist.”

Initial sampling was performed by MDH on St. Louis Park water in 1978, and several wells exceeded the guideline limit established by the World Health Organization. As a result, the city shut down six wells over the next three years, causing supply issues and resulting in water restrictions in St. Louis Park.

In 1979 MDH found a significant increase in breast cancer in women in St. Louis Park but concluded in a report to the Minnesota legislature six years later that it was unlikely that it was related to water contamination. “Neither the 1978 testing by MDH nor the subsequent testing that continues to this day has detected cancer-causing chemicals in the city’s water supply wells above safe levels,” Gregg emphasized.

However, one recommendation of the report was the creation of a statewide cancer surveillance system “to enable the systematic collection and analysis of cancer incidence data.” The Minnesota Cancer Surveillance System was established on January 1, 1988, and all cancers in Minnesota residents are reported to the Minnesota Department of Health.

MDH engineer Bassam Banat sampled the water at one of St. Louis Park’s wells in the 1990s.

Dealing with supply issues and eventually treating the water to remove creosote chemicals was a major task for longtime water superintendent Scott Anderson, who recently retired; it is an ongoing one for Anderson’s successor, Jay Hall, and others in the utility, such as supervisors Bruce Berthiaume and John Laumann.

The city has added two water treatment plants with granular activated carbon (GAC). One, constructed in 1985, is located in the well field by Bronx Park, off Minnetonka Boulevard and Jersey Avenue. Hall said that water from two of the wells on the site passes through the sand and carbon filters. The other GAC plant, built in 1991, is in the southern part of the city, at 41st Street and Natchez Avenue, near the border with Edina.

St. Louis Park added granular activated carbon treatment to its plant in Bronx Park and to another plant in the southern part of the city.

With the consent decree nearing its 30-year anniversary, some objectives have been achieved, but the creosote remains buried at the site. “St. Louis Park groundwater will probably continue to require testing long into the future,” says Gregg.

The St. Louis Park Historical Society, which in 2001 produced a book on the city’s history titled Something in the Water, wrote:

Having a creosote plant in our town has been a mixed blessing. Of course there was the smell in the air, the taste in the water, and the fear of a health risk. On the other hand, the plant provided much-needed employment for many people over a period of some 65 years and produced valuable building products instrumental to the early growth of St. Louis Park and area railroads. It’s gone now, cleaned up and decontaminated—in fact, St. Louis Park has some of the most tested water in the state. But there are still some who wonder if there is “something in the water.”

A retention pond at 32nd Street and Oregon Avenue frequently overflowed and flooded adjacent homes. In the spring of 1965, the water also overwhelmed a lift station and drew a pair of nearby residents. (The smaller of the two lads in the above photo is now the editor of the Waterline.) The city pumped the water to higher ground through a 12-inch pipe and found that the system wasn’t child-proof. A local miscreant (not one of the two shown in the photo) unscrewed one of the caps on the pipe, resulting in a geyser, shown in the picture below with Republic Creosoting in the background.

Last Updated:

St. Louis Park High School closes Friday after 2 fights

St. Louis Park High School canceled classes and extracurricular activities Friday after two fights broke out at the school on Thursday.According to a post on the school’s website, a fight involving two groups of students erupted at the end of the school day. Later, adults who did not work at the school but knew about the earlier fight got involved in another altercation.St. Louis Park staff and law enforcement intervened to break up the later fight. Two women — 22-year-old Abreeha Smith and 41-year-old Latoys Milon ...

St. Louis Park High School canceled classes and extracurricular activities Friday after two fights broke out at the school on Thursday.

According to a post on the school’s website, a fight involving two groups of students erupted at the end of the school day. Later, adults who did not work at the school but knew about the earlier fight got involved in another altercation.

St. Louis Park staff and law enforcement intervened to break up the later fight. Two women — 22-year-old Abreeha Smith and 41-year-old Latoys Milon — were arrested, police said. Both have been released from custody, and neither has been formally charged.

“Obviously my first reaction was actually to text and call my daughter to make sure she was OK,” said Dan Israel, who has a daughter at St. Louis Park High School. “She understandably, like everybody else, is upset and anxious about it.”

Some students and staff suffered scrapes and bruises, but no major injuries were reported. It’s unclear whether any weapons were involved, and the school said it was looking into whether the fights were “racially motivated.”

“Definitely crazy, never seen a fight that big before at St. Louis Park,” said Frankie Robello, who graduated from St. Louis Park High School last year. “There’s kind of always been fights here — definitely last year there was some — but I’m surprised to hear about school closing down the next day for sure.”

Police say a juvenile response officer responded to the situation. According to the school’s website, this is a new position since moving away from a school resource officer and they are not stationed in the schools.

“I think it’s unconscionable and absurd and maddening at this point that they haven’t figured out a way to get them back into the schools,” Israel said.

St. Louis Park High School was closed Friday for classes and activities — including the girl’s basketball game and sports practices — while staff investigated what happened. All other schools in the district held classes as usual.

Israel and other parents who spoke off-camera with 5 EYEWITNESS NEWS are pleading for this kind of behavior to stop.

“Our school is doing as good of a job as they can dealing with these kinds of things, but obviously, we want to make sure our kids are safe, and it doesn’t sound like things are as safe as they could be,” Israel said.

The school said it will have counselors on hand for students and will have “additional layers of safety” next week.

After lawsuit threat, St. Louis Park Public Schools will allow Somali families to opt out of LGBTQ+ books

St. Louis Park Public Schools will allow opt-outs for families who don’t want their children to read books with LGBTQ+ characters, after six Somali Muslim families threatened to sue the district.“We think this is a win for religious freedom for people of all faiths, without even having to go to court,” said Kayla Toney, an attorney for the First Liberty Institute, a Texas-...

St. Louis Park Public Schools will allow opt-outs for families who don’t want their children to read books with LGBTQ+ characters, after six Somali Muslim families threatened to sue the district.

“We think this is a win for religious freedom for people of all faiths, without even having to go to court,” said Kayla Toney, an attorney for the First Liberty Institute, a Texas-based law firm focused on religious freedom that represents the parents.

Hodan Hassan, who has lived in St. Louis Park for 14 years and has four children in the district, said that she was glad when the district granted her request to allow her children to opt out of books with LGBTQ+ characters last week.

“We came to America for religious freedom in the Constitution, and so our kids will have a great opportunity,” Hodan said in an interview. “By granting us and other families the opportunity to opt out of teaching that violates our deeply held religious beliefs, families are able to raise their children according to the principle that they value the most.”

In a statement, St. Louis Park Public Schools said it was proud of the diverse books in its literacy program and was committed to honoring all students’ identities.

“St. Louis Park Public Schools has always complied with the state law regarding parents’ statutory right to opt out of instructional materials, and we will continue to do so,” the district said. “However, district staff will not conduct that review on behalf of any families or attempt to determine what materials may be considered objectionable. Additionally, class discussions do not constitute instructional materials and are not subject to review or opt-outs.”

The district’s statement stressed that its decision was bound by state law.

“Opt-outs based on representation of protected classes do not uphold our values of creating safe and inclusive learning and working environments in our schools,” the statement continued. “However, because it is required within state law, any change would need to happen with the involvement of state lawmakers.”

‘Reasonable arrangements’

Under Minnesota law, every school district must have a procedure for parents to review instructional materials, and, if the parent objects to the content, “to make reasonable arrangements with school personnel for alternative instruction.”

But some legal experts have cautioned that districts must tread a careful line on accommodating these families, or risk a discrimination lawsuit.

“The parental curriculum review statute says a school district needs to have a procedure for parents to review the content of instructional materials,” Christy Hall, senior staff attorney for Gender Justice, a St. Paul-based law firm focused on gender equity, told Sahan Journal in December. “It does not say that procedure needs to be, ‘You tell me if there’s any LGBTQ+ content, and then I will opt my child out of it.’”

In early October, teachers at several St. Louis Park elementary schools introduced books with LGBTQ+ characters. Those books included “Our Subway Baby,” about two dads who adopt a baby; “My Shadow Is Pink,” about a boy who likes to wear dresses; and “Ho’onani: Hula Warrior,” about a young genderqueer Hawaiian child who wants to lead a boys’ hula troupe. Parents said they had made requests to exempt their children from reading these books to two elementary school principals, but the principals refused.

The parents then brought their concerns to the October 24 school board meeting.

“We wholeheartedly respect the importance of affirming LGBTQ+ identities, but we are troubled by the way these books have been presented to our children,” said one mother, who identified herself by her first name, Ilhan. “The manner in which they have been taught appears to exceed the boundaries of affirmation, urging every child to delve into their own understanding of gender and sexuality. This approach, we believe, directly conflicts with our deeply held religious beliefs.”

Board Member Sarah Davis, who is married to a woman and has two children, spoke up at the end of the meeting.

“I’m thinking about my child,” she said, her voice choked up. “I’m thinking about what it would feel like for him if I said that having a book about a concept of two dads—he has two moms—is troubling. The idea that my wife and I exist, that our family exists, is not controversial.”

The parents contacted the First Liberty Institute, which has argued several religious freedom cases before the U.S. Supreme Court. In November and December, Toney sent two demand letters to the district on her clients’ behalf, requesting that the schools allow their children to opt out of these books and receive advance notice of any discussions of LGBTQ+ issues. The December letter criticized the district’s form to request alternative instruction as overly intrusive and burdensome for immigrant families.

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The St. Louis Park Public Schools district policy advises parents who wish to review curriculum materials to contact their child’s teacher. Parents can either borrow the materials or review them at school. But in her December letter, Toney said that parents needed advance notice of curriculum and classroom discussion. Unless the district provided this notice, Toney continued, she would “proceed as our clients direct, likely pursuing all available legal remedies.”

In a January email to the First Liberty Institute, Maggie Wallner, counsel for St. Louis Park Public Schools, affirmed that the district would allow parents to review curriculum and pursue alternative instruction. But she also indicated the district would not change its curriculum review procedures.

“The District understands its obligation under Minnesota law to provide families an opportunity to review the content of instructional materials and pursue alternative instruction,” Wallner wrote. However, she stopped short of agreeing to review curriculum materials on the parents’ behalf. “District staff does not and will not conduct a review on behalf of families or attempt to determine what materials may be considered objectionable.”

Toney said that her clients had since filled out the form the district provided, skipping questions they did not want to answer. They requested to opt out of the three picture books they had already encountered in class, as well as any other “teaching on LGBTQ+ sexualities, sexual orientation or gender identity,” she said.

In the past two weeks, all six of her clients had been notified that their requests to opt out of LGBTQ+ books had been granted. The middle school had even guaranteed in writing that it would provide advance notice on these topics, Toney said, though she declined to share the letter, citing the privacy of minors.

“The fact that at least one of them is able to do it shows that any school should be able to provide advance notice,” Toney said. “That’s our understanding of the law.”

Rachel Hicks, the district’s communications director, said that one middle school family had received this notice after meeting with teachers and the principal to request alternative instruction. But advance notice would not be provided more broadly, she said. “This is a particular case in middle school where it is being done for this particular family.”

Hodan said she was happy the district had recognized the importance her community places on what children are taught.

“All we ever wanted was to know what our kids are learning and make sure that it doesn’t conflict with our faith,” she said.

Toney said she was encouraged to resolve the matter without going to court. But she said she would continue to monitor how the district responds to her clients’ requests for advance notice.

“We are hopeful that they will in fact follow through with this guarantee,” she said. “And if they don’t, we’ll certainly stay tuned and continue to defend our clients where that’s necessary.”

St. Louis Park's iconic Galaxy Drive-In tapped for a big makeover this year

ST. LOUIS PARK, Minn. — If you've driven along Highway 7 in St. Louis Park, odds are the Galaxy Drive-In has caught your eye. The throwback spot has been dark for a few years but a local duo just bought the place and is about to give it a facelift.The Galaxy will soon become Well's Roadside, which will keep some drive-in spots but also add year-round dining on an all-season, pet-friendly pergola patio.The co-owners say this is their seventh location, but that they've never had such an overwhelming communi...

ST. LOUIS PARK, Minn. — If you've driven along Highway 7 in St. Louis Park, odds are the Galaxy Drive-In has caught your eye. The throwback spot has been dark for a few years but a local duo just bought the place and is about to give it a facelift.

The Galaxy will soon become Well's Roadside, which will keep some drive-in spots but also add year-round dining on an all-season, pet-friendly pergola patio.

The co-owners say this is their seventh location, but that they've never had such an overwhelming community response to a project before.

"They remember growing up here. They worked here over the decades. People are really excited this is coming back to be a unique fun spot for the St. Louis Park neighborhood," Craft & Crew Hospitality co-owner Luke Derheim said.

The planned menu will be succinct, with a focus on the drive-in standby: burgers. However, they do plan to add beer and wine as a new addition.

The redesign could start in a matter of weeks. They hope to open early this summer, and they say they'll be looking for neighborhood feedback as they finalize their design and concept.

Erin Hassanzadeh

Erin is back home in the Twin Cities after stops in South Korea and Omaha. The Jefferson High School grad (Go Jags!) is excited to get back to storytelling in the community that raised her.

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Galaxy Drive-In Finds an Owner

Craft & Crew Hospitality has agreed to purchase Galaxy Drive-In in St. Louis Park from “eatertainment” auteur Steve Schussler, according to C&C co-owner David Benowitz. The restaurant had been listed for sale for just under $1 million. C&C operates six local table-service restaurants including The Block in St. Louis Park.Schus...

Craft & Crew Hospitality has agreed to purchase Galaxy Drive-In in St. Louis Park from “eatertainment” auteur Steve Schussler, according to C&C co-owner David Benowitz. The restaurant had been listed for sale for just under $1 million. C&C operates six local table-service restaurants including The Block in St. Louis Park.

Schussler, who created Rainforest Café and has created several highly successful restaurants at Walt Disney World, opened Galaxy in 2009 as his first local venture. A dramatic re-concept of the dingy but beloved circa 1951 Wagner’s Drive-In on Highway 7, it was a sort of a Jetson’s environment for classic American drive-in food. Unfortunately, Schussler could never find the right operator for the eatery, which suffered from mediocre word-of-mouth and the inherent limitations of a seasonal business. It has opened and closed several times since 2009, but did not operate this year.

C&C’s plan includes a partial renovation to create a “pergola” covering that will allow for year-round dining. Benowitz said he plans to change the name to “Wells’ Roadside.” The updated drive-in will be modeled after Gott’s Roadside, a loved chain of burger outposts in northern California. The menu will consist of burgers, sandwiches, and ice cream, plus beer and wine, and will be operated as a quick-serve concept with a digital ordering platform, not table service. Benowitz said some of the Galaxy structure and iconography will be removed, and colors will be changed, but won’t be made unrecognizable to fans of the building.

Benowitz said he and partner Luke Derheim had been looking for a site to open a seventh restaurant, but interest rates and the volatile economics of sit-down restaurants made them reluctant to pull the trigger on anything. Benowitz had talked to Schussler as early as 2018 about Galaxy and restarted conversations in spring 2023. Pivoting C&C to a quick-serve concept, which use less labor and land, and tends to have better margins in the current restaurant economy, was not a goal. Benowitz believes the Wells’ Roadside idea has multi-unit potential and hopes to open several over the coming years.

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